Refinancing a mortgage is the process of acquiring a new loan to pay off an existing lender.

Four Possible Reasons to Refinance

A mortgage is generally the largest debt most homeowners have to manage, and it is a good idea to give your personal real estate finance portfolio a check-up at least once a year.

Since there are several reasons a homeowner may choose to refinance, we’ll take a look at the top four circumstances.

A drop in mortgage rates, lowering current mortgage payments, debt consolidation or changing mortgage programs are four possible reasons to choose a refinance.

Calculating the Net Benefit of a Refinance

Calculating the net benefit of refinancing can be a challenging task if you do not understand what to calculate.

We are going to focus on the net benefits of refinancing from the standpoint of lowering your interest rate.

Although there are several reasons to refinance, lowering your mortgage rate to save on interest payments over the term of the loan is the most popular.

Calculating the actual savings can be a tricky chore unless you know the difference between cash flow savings and interest savings.

Should I Get A Home Equity Line of Credit or Cash-Out Refi to Make Home Improvements?

For homeowners interested in making some property improvements without tapping into their savings or investment accounts, the two main options are to either take out a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC), or do a cash-out refinance.

A Home Equity Loan is similar to the line of credit, except there is a lump sum given to the borrower at the time of funding and the payment terms are generally fixed.

Both a Line and Loan would hold a subordinate position to the first loan on title, and are typically referred to as a “Second Mortgage.”

Since second mortgages are paid after the first lien holder in the case of default foreclosure or short sale, interest rates are higher in order to justify the risk.

Fees, Interest Rate, and Timeline are the three main factors to consider which option to choose in order to pull equity out of a property.